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Important Tips to Improve Interior Photography

Interior Photography

1. Use A Wide Angle Lens

Choosing the best interior photography is the first thing that can make or break your indoor photos. While your exact choice of camera or body brand is usually not important, you do need to have a full frame camera (as opposed to a crop sensor camera) and the right lens to pair with it. Since interiors are often tight, this means a wide-angle lens. In general, a lens in the 16-24mm range is fine. Anything wider than 16mm runs the risk of looking too distorted, although this can often be fixed in post-production if you’re knowledgeable enough.

2. Check The Diaphragm

For interior photography, you really need to choose the best f-stop depending on the exact details you want to capture. If you’re shooting a large area and want most of the scene to be in sharp focus, choose a small aperture (larger f-number, such as f/9 or f/11). On the other hand, choose a larger aperture (smaller f-stop, e.g. f/4) to remove unwanted background detail.

3. Use A Tripod

To avoid camera shake and excessive noise from high ISO, it’s usually best to shoot indoors with a tripod. This is especially true if you’re using HDR or bracketing (described below) to capture images. A tripod can slow you down, but a slower pace can help because it forces you to focus on composition and the perfect shot. Tripods also save your arms and back by taking the weight of the camera and lens.

4. Natural Lighting Is Best

Interior spaces can be very difficult to illuminate with flash or artificial lighting due to the large number of reflective surfaces. The last thing you want to do is make your photo look washed out or add harsh shadows that shouldn’t be there. As a result, it’s always best to use natural light when taking indoor photos, especially if you’re working in tight spaces where it’s difficult to bring in a strobe or artificial light. With this in mind, consider how natural light will fill the space and plan to shoot earlier or later in the day to avoid harsh sunlight.

5. Consider Using HDR Or Bracketing

Since shooting interiors in natural light is often the greatest option, HDR is occasionally the best option to ensure that your image has harmonious shadows and highlights. High Dynamic Range, or HDR, photography is occasionally criticised by other photographers for giving images an overly dramatic or unnatural appearance.

However, HDR can be quite useful for taking pictures of spaces with a wide variety of lighting. While some cameras have HDR photography options built-in, others need you to take three photos—one normal, one underexposed, and one overexposed—and then combine them in post-production. Explore different ways to shoot HDR or bracket and make sure you have them in your arsenal just in case.

6. Rise Up And Make Changes

Consider every aspect of your shot. See something out of place, like a wrinkled blanket or a trash can sticking out from under the table? Go ahead and fix it. Indoor photography is all about capturing beauty, so carefully compose every detail of the scene before pressing the shutter. Also, be sure to do a full inspection of the entire space and view it from all angles. This will help you fix small details in person, so you don’t have to spend extra time with blur or clone tools in post-production.

7. Shoot From Multiple Angles

Indoor photography can be tricky because it can be difficult to choose the best angle or perspective. As a result, try to shoot from at least two different perspectives. This will give you and your client, if you work for one, options to choose from. You might surprise yourself by taking a better shot from an angle you never thought of. In addition, the lines are different, also try to take both horizontal and vertical pictures. In general, horizontal images are best for interiors, but vertical photos can work in some cases.

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